The Princess

To My Beloved Royalty...

So, it's probably a good time for me to update my page's layout.... what are the better tools for the layperson who doesn't think in the language of code?


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Ravenbird
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I hope Felix shares the garbage whit Sarahs cat...

Submitted December 14, 2014 at 4:02PM



Kyle
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Yeah...Marta really didn't take those double standards into consideration before expecting Felix to do this. 

Submitted December 14, 2014 at 9:40PM



Ravenbird
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No one should be forced into a gender stereotype.
(
Not even cisgender ) ;-P

Submitted December 14, 2014 at 9:48PM



RachelN
 

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I like the obvious parallel with Sarah's situation. Yes, if you challenge gender assumptions, you end up wearing a trash can for a hat.  LOL


Ravenbird: I would modify your comment to say, "No one should be forced into someone else's idea of a 'correct' gender presentation." I've often been criticized by other transpeople because I to some extent conform to female gender stereotypes, but that's the sort of gender presentation I'm comfortable with.

Submitted December 15, 2014 at 4:57AM



JD
 

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Quote:
So, it's probably a good time for me to update my page's layout.... what are the better tools for the layperson who doesn't think in the language of code?


I know I've been a bit quiet lately, but I have been banging away here and there at bits of code in the fight against spammers and to improve the reader's experience. If you'd like to change your layout, you can do it yourself with an html layout tool such as InDesign, or have a friend help with that, then send me the design and I'll implement it into your site. Or, you can layout your design using Photoshop, including how and where you want everything placed, then I'll help you split that into design code that will work within the system running here. Also, you'll want to include an image for linking to your Patreon along with the link, and the correct code to make your Project Wonderful ad work again.
Please contact me either way... I'm always here to help you, Christine, and happy to do so.

Submitted December 15, 2014 at 8:20AM



flitterella
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Important point made here. People who were assigned female at birth certainly face discrimination and hardship later in life if they deviate from what is "expected", but people who were assigned male at birth face harassment and violence to a much greater degree if they choose to or if they must deviate in order to not be in pain.

Submitted December 15, 2014 at 4:25PM



Nestor Notabilis
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I....well broadly speaking I agree: in the West. And I thought the same thing looking at the comic. I was never bullied or hit for my 'tom boy' tendencies but being a 'sissy' was a different story and it's an important point to make but-

I grew up in the Middle East, the kind of place where a man has a legal right to beat his wife. And yes anyone assigned male and expressing differently would be dead. But anyone assigned female and displaying such 'masculine' qualities as speaking their mind, going out alone, or even having a job, going to school can be beaten to death for it. Often by their families. Or just beaten until they don't do it anymore which is a longer slower death. That might seem off topic when the setting here is (I'm guessing) American but this comic makes me think about that a lot, think about home. And it makes me wonder how much my own masculinity my own gender-questioning is rooted in that background.

The West has a different sort of discrimination. Here....it's like being male is a plus rather than being female is a minus. So if a female assigned person starts acting different it's almost like 'oh well obviously she wants that plus' whereas when it's the other way around it's almost seen as throwing something away.

Sorry that was long, rambley and just one person's take. Damn writer does a good job that we're both getting all this thought from one strip.

Submitted December 16, 2014 at 11:15AM




alice
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I think wordpress do a lot of good themes without much if any code required - just search for "wordpress themes".

I would offer to help, since I swim in code, but not got much spare time at the moment and I'm usually not swimming in HTML :P

Submitted December 15, 2014 at 5:24PM



Lynn
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ok so i read all of your webcomic in 1 morning now i have nothing to do o-o

Submitted December 16, 2014 at 9:25AM



df
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my artist friends like dreamweaver.

Submitted December 16, 2014 at 10:38AM



Pinkbatmax
 

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Quote from Nestor Notabilis:
Guest post by "Nestor Notabilis"
I....well broadly speaking I agree: in the West. And I thought the same thing looking at the comic. I was never bullied or hit for my 'tom boy' tendencies but being a 'sissy' was a different story and it's an important point to make but-

I grew up in the Middle East, the kind of place where a man has a legal right to beat his wife. And yes anyone assigned male and expressing differently would be dead. But anyone assigned female and displaying such 'masculine' qualities as speaking their mind, going out alone, or even having a job, going to school can be beaten to death for it. Often by their families. Or just beaten until they don't do it anymore which is a longer slower death. That might seem off topic when the setting here is (I'm guessing) American but this comic makes me think about that a lot, think about home. And it makes me wonder how much my own masculinity my own gender-questioning is rooted in that background.

The West has a different sort of discrimination. Here....it's like being male is a plus rather than being female is a minus. So if a female assigned person starts acting different it's almost like 'oh well obviously she wants that plus' whereas when it's the other way around it's almost seen as throwing something away.

Sorry that was long, rambley and just one person's take. Damn writer does a good job that we're both getting all this thought from one strip.

.

I don't think it's off topic at all. I'm grateful you shared it.

If there's one thing I don't want this to say is that it's easy for ANYONE to cross gender lines, and break gender taboos. Even in my culture, where there are more taboos about a man in a dress than a woman wearing a tie, there are still soul-crushing repercussions for those who break that taboo. It's not easy. It's never easy.

Thank you for your take.






Submitted December 16, 2014 at 1:44PM



Nestor Notabilis
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You've never made it look easy in the comic. That's a big part of what I like, you tackle a lot of 'complicated' things and show them really simply. Everyone in the comic expresses themselves differently and they have different hurdles and prejudices that they overcome. It looks simple, but nothing is simplified.

(And in case my original comment wasn't clear I haven't gone through anything outside the Western norm in response to.....well me, even though that was the background radiation I grew up with. I really feel for and worry for kids out there though, most of them don't have any real options.)

Submitted December 17, 2014 at 1:39AM



flitterella
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Quote from Nestor Notabilis:
Guest post by "Nestor Notabilis"
I....well broadly speaking I agree: in the West. And I thought the same thing looking at the comic. I was never bullied or hit for my 'tom boy' tendencies but being a 'sissy' was a different story and it's an important point to make but-

I grew up in the Middle East, the kind of place where a man has a legal right to beat his wife. And yes anyone assigned male and expressing differently would be dead. But anyone assigned female and displaying such 'masculine' qualities as speaking their mind, going out alone, or even having a job, going to school can be beaten to death for it. Often by their families. Or just beaten until they don't do it anymore which is a longer slower death. That might seem off topic when the setting here is (I'm guessing) American but this comic makes me think about that a lot, think about home. And it makes me wonder how much my own masculinity my own gender-questioning is rooted in that background.

The West has a different sort of discrimination. Here....it's like being male is a plus rather than being female is a minus. So if a female assigned person starts acting different it's almost like 'oh well obviously she wants that plus' whereas when it's the other way around it's almost seen as throwing something away.

Sorry that was long, rambley and just one person's take. Damn writer does a good job that we're both getting all this thought from one strip.


Thank you so much for sharing your perspective with me. I will definitely take that under consideration next time. I was speaking with a very white colonialist/settler North American-centric point of view and I need to be more careful about that.

Submitted December 19, 2014 at 6:00AM



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